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CLP Questions

What is CLP?

What is CLP?

The CLP Regulation is an EU law that aims to make the classification and labelling of hazardous chemicals easier, more harmonised and more consistent. Following the UK's exit from the EU, GB has retained the CLP Regulation, with a few minor changes. These arrangements mean GB continues to adopt GHS. CLP was phased in gradually over a multiple-year transitional period so that the burden on business was reduced.  CLP requires chemicals to be classified for their hazards and for them to be packaged and labelled accordingly.  So let's break it down, CLP (Classification of Labels & Packaging) Classification: Chemical classification identifies a chemical by its physical and chemical properties as well as its uses and applications. Chemical classification systems are designed to help:-identify hazardous chemicals so that they can be controlled appropriately;-protect workers, & consumers from exposure to harmful chemicals;-protect the environment from pollution caused by hazardous chemicals;-prevent accidental release of hazardous chemicals into the environment. Labels: Labels are there to help identify the hazardous chemicals within a substance or product, and explain what the hazards are and how to avoid them. Packaging: The way a dangerous substance is packaged is also important to ensure that chemicals are stored and disposed of safely and correctly. Depending on the severity of a chemical and its hazards, tactile warnings of danger, and/or child-resistant fastenings may be required.  

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Why Candle Safety Pictograms are not generic.

Generic? Not quite, here's why Candle safety Pictograms (not to be confused with hazard pictograms) are not generic. The pictograms are symbols that alert people to the potential dangers of a product. They're typically used on packaging and labels to help consumers understand what kind of precautions they should take when using the product, or if they should avoid it altogether. As candles come in many different forms, their potential dangers differ. That's why when choosing pictograms, they should represent the product they're being placed on.  For example, the floating candle pictogram on a glass jar container candle is about as much use as a chocolate teapot.  So which do I need for my candle?  Let's start with the pictograms that are mandatory across all candle products.     General Warning Pictogram. (not required on a combined safety CLP where the H317 (!) pictogram is present) Never leave a burning candle unattended Keep away from things that can catch fire. Keep away from children and pets.   These pictograms (with an exception of the yellow warning triangle) should always appear on your candles) Extra mandatory pictograms depending on candle type Use a heat resistant candleholder. Mandatory pictogram for PILLAR CANDLES Use in a suitable bowl filled with water. Mandatory pictogram for FLOATING CANDLES   OPTIONAL Pictograms These pictograms are not mandatory but require a bit of thought as to which would be appropriate for your product.  For example, if I was making a pillar candle, I might want to alert the user to trim the edges of the candle to prevent the walls from falling in. Or, if I was making a votive, or candle that completely liquifies I'd use the pictogram to alert them of this. Trim wick to x cm.(x represents the maximum length of the wick)  Keep candles at least x cm apart. (x represents the distance between candles) Keep wax pool clear of matches and debris. Place candle upright. Do not burn in a draught. Trim edge if higher than x cm.(x represents the max height of the edge) Never use liquid to extinguish. Do not move a burning candle. Snuff out the flame. Do not blow it out. Do not place near a heat source. Do not touch, may be hot. Do not burn in a warming unit. Remove packaging before use. This candle liquefies, use a suitable container. 

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Candle Test Log Sheet (Free Download)

This is our old candle test log sheet, in a printable format. It may be of use to some of you. Download PDF

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Print & Punch Technique

Problem aligning your prints? No problem. Heres a simple workaround. CLP can be a lot to got your head around. When you finally have a template you're happy with, or have purchased one of our printable CLP PDF's, there's nothing more frustrating than printing, only to find that your labels don't align with the sticker paper you purchased. Here is an efficient workaround for those who have a printer, but suffer with alignment issues when printing.    You'll need a few things to get you going: A4 sticker paper (1 big A4 sticker sheet rather than multiple labels on a page) A printer (I personally recommend the Epson Eco Tank range) Your design ready to print And finally, the cheat part, a 2" hole punch. Genius! Print your design onto your A4 sticker paper, then use your hole punch to cut out your labels. It's that simple. You'll need your designs to fit your desired punch, for example a great size punch is 2 inches, so your clp design could need to be a 2" circle. this design can be repeated on your page.     Sticky Print Pixels is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.co.uk

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Diffuser CLP and IFRA class

  When we make scented products that require to be labelled under Guidance on labeling and packaging in accordance with Regulation (EC) No 1272/2008. We look at the IFRA certificates provided by our oil suppliers to assess the advised maximum use percentage of an oil in a particular product. In this instance, we are taking about diffusers.  Usually this is relatively simple, however at the moment we are in a transition period between the 48th and 49th amendment. As per the IFRA 49th amendment, Reed diffusers now fall into category 10a (previously, they were class 11) What does this mean for you? If you manufactured a product, before May 10th 2021, you can still use class 11 of the IFRA certificate. This is not indefinite however. This is a transition period to enable you to sell existing products before the final May 10th 2022 deadline. If you're introducing a new product to the market, you would implement the changes under the IFRA 49th amendment immediately, as the deadline for new products was May 10th 2021. How do I find the class percentage for my oil? Pop onto your suppliers website, locate the documents for the fragrance oil you intend to use, look for the IFRA certificate. (please note some suppliers only have and IFRA 48th at the moment, if this is the case they will update their documents before the May 2022 deadline, so its important to check back for updates, because when they upload the 49th amendment, the percentages for each class will more than likely change.) Find the IFRA class limit (either 10a, or 11 depending on the points explained above). This will tell you the max oil percentage that is recommended. This is the maximum amount of oil that you should be using in your diffuser.     

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What details need to be on my labels?

According to CLP Article 17:• Name (Your name, or if registered as a business, your business name)• Address and telephone number (This must be traceable)• Weight (this does not have to be on the CLP but should be somewhere on your product)• Product identifiers• Hazard pictograms (If triggered)• Signal word (If triggered)• Hazard statements, precautionary statements and supplemental information, where applicable.

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Where can I find Guidance on labeling and packaging?

Where can I find ECHA's Guidance on labelling and packaging in accordance with Regulation (EC) No 1272/2008? You can view the full document, from the ECHA here "From 1 January 2021, the classification, labelling and packaging of chemicals placed on the market in Great Britain (England, Scotland and Wales) is regulated by the ‘Retained CLP Regulation (EU) No. 1272/2008 as amended for Great Britain’, known as GB CLP"

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Why does my CLP label look a little empty?

Why does my CLP label look a little empty?

Why does my CLP label state the following, or contain no pictograms? "This material does not meet the criteria for classification under Regulation (EC) No 1272/2008. Safety data sheet available onrequest." Some fragrance oils, when applied to your product, do not trigger any hazards or allergens according to the ECHA. Therefor they are not classified as hazardous and do not require pictograms, hazards or precautions. 

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